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These U.S. Cities Have the Highest STD Rates [May 2021]

Our research team dives deep into the CDC’s latest STD Surveillance Statistics and provides our analysis of current trends.

Last Updated: May 17, 2021

Innerbody.com created this interactive map depicting metro areas with the highest STD rates.
Data source: CDC

After a 6-month, Covid-related delay, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finally released its latest Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report last month, and the numbers are disturbing. For the 6th consecutive year, the STD rate in the United States hit a record high.

Covid-19 has understandably dominated the news over the past 14 months. As we head into recovery and our economy begins to open up in the summer, it’s important not to lose sight of the viruses that predated the pandemic and currently infect over 110 million Americans, with over 20 million new infections each year.

For our 4th annual study of STD rates, the Innerbody Research team analyzed the latest statistics on a city-by-city basis and developed our list of the Top 100 cities with the highest STD rates. In this year’s report, the city with the highest STD rate was Jackson, MS, overtaking Baltimore, MD, which moved to 2nd.

In addition to ranking the 100 cities with the highest STD rates, below we’ll provide some takeaways from our report; spotlight cities whose STD rates have significantly improved or declined; highlight racial disparities that emerge from the CDC’s data; and address what this data means in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jump to:

Quick takeaways
Cities show movement in our rankings
Data illuminates racial inequities
The Rankings: Top 25 U.S. cities with the highest STD rates
Rounding out our Top 100
Covid-19 and underreporting STD rates
Proposed actions to improve the national outlook
How we collected data for this report
Sources
About Innerbody Research

Quick takeaways

Before we get to the full rankings, here are some findings and trends that we observed:

  • Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis top the list of most commonly reported new STD infections. Taken together, infections from these three reportable diseases increased almost 30% from 2015 to 2019.
  • The South continues to be disproportionately represented among the hardest-hit cities. Of the Top 25, 17 are southern cities (or 19, if you use the Census Bureau’s definition to include Baltimore and the District of Columbia).
  • Four of the Top 25 cities are located in Florida, which is a worrisome development for the Sunshine State. Miami, for instance, spiked upward five spots to the 24th highest rate.
  • Meanwhile, across the continent, major California cities saw an increase in STD rates. San Francisco swapped positions with Philadelphia, PA to rank 3rd highest (up from 4th). Los Angeles, San Diego, and Sacramento all rose over ten spots to rank 37th, 55th, and 51st, respectively.
  • California and Texas tie for the state with the most cities in our rankings, at 14 apiece, though these are after all two of the largest states in our country. But Alabama – at around two percent of our national population – is one of the more overrepresented states, with six cities in our report.
  • We noted that three of the Top 10 cities are relatively small (Augusta, GA, Montgomery, AL, and Fayetteville, NC) but share one thing in common: they are home to relatively large military bases.

Cities show movement in our rankings

Numerous cities saw significant movement upward with higher infection rates, including:

  • Washington, DC rose 12 spots from 17 → 5
  • Knoxville, TN rose 17 spots from 26 → 9
  • New Orleans, LA rose 13 spots from 24 → 11
  • Jacksonville, FL rose 15 spots from 38 → 23
  • Albany, NY rose 15 spots from 68 → 53

It wasn’t all bad news; some cities bucked the national trend with improved STD rates. For instance, Milwaukee, WI and Indianapolis, IN both moved out of the Top 10, though they remain among the Top 25 cities.

Other cities’ infection rates improved dramatically, such as:

  • Shreveport, LA improved 12 spots from 9 → 21
  • Denver, CO improved 13 spots from 19 → 32
  • Richmond, VA improved 12 spots from 32 → 44
  • Portland, OR improved 15 spots from 73 → 88
  • Omaha, NE improved 13 spots from 79 → 92

Data illuminates racial inequities

The CDC’s data this year highlights an ongoing trend that appears to worsen each year: the STD burden is not equal within our cities. While we are seeing increases in STDs overall across many groups, the STD burden continued to hit minority racial and ethnic groups the hardest. The fact that many of the highest-ranking cities in our study have a higher percentage of minority residents also appears to reflect this trend.

Based on CDC data, STD rates were:

  • 5-8 times higher for African Americans or Black people than for non-Hispanic White people
  • 3-5 times higher for American Indians, Native Alaskans, and Native Hawaiians than for non-Hispanic White people
  • 1-2 times higher for Hispanic or Latino people than for non-Hispanic white people

Experts such as the CDC’s Jo Valentine, Director of the Office of Health Equity, point to systemic inequalities that lead to lower access to health and testing and subsequently poorer health outcomes.

“Focusing on hard-hit populations is critical to reducing disparities,” said Valentine. “To effectively reduce these disparities, the social, cultural, and economic conditions that make it more difficult for some populations to stay healthy must be addressed. These include poverty, unstable housing, drug use, lack of medical insurance or regular medical provider, and high burden of STDs in some communities.”

The Rankings: Top 25 U.S. cities with the highest STD rates

#1

Jackson, MS

Jackson, MS
  • STD Cases / 100K

    4,281

  • Metro Population

    342,715

  • HIV Cases

    2,541

  • Chlamydia Cases

    3,984

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    2,081

  • Syphilis Cases

    100

#2

Baltimore, MD

Baltimore, MD
  • STD Cases / 100K

    3,707

  • Metro Population

    602,495

  • HIV Cases

    9,441

  • Chlamydia Cases

    8,602

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    3,982

  • Syphilis Cases

    312

#3

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    3,150

  • Metro Population

    883,305

  • HIV Cases

    12,149

  • Chlamydia Cases

    9,505

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    5,593

  • Syphilis Cases

    579

#4

Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia, PA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,827

  • Metro Population

    1,584,138

  • HIV Cases

    16,917

  • Chlamydia Cases

    20,354

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    7,043

  • Syphilis Cases

    470

#5

Washington DC

Washington DC
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,771

  • Metro Population

    1,611,763

  • HIV Cases

    62

  • Chlamydia Cases

    17,589

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    2,236

  • Syphilis Cases

    865

#6

Augusta, GA

Augusta, GA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,596

  • Metro Population

    201,554

  • HIV Cases

    1,400

  • Chlamydia Cases

    2,636

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,100

  • Syphilis Cases

    97

#7

New York, NY

New York, NY
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,544

  • Metro Population

    7,922,569

  • HIV Cases

    97,206

  • Chlamydia Cases

    74,014

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    28,394

  • Syphilis Cases

    1,952

#8

Montgomery, AL

Montgomery, AL
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,365

  • Metro Population

    225,763

  • HIV Cases

    1,470

  • Chlamydia Cases

    2,569

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,226

  • Syphilis Cases

    75

#9

Knoxville, TN

Knoxville, TN
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,314

  • Metro Population

    673,120

  • HIV Cases

    960

  • Chlamydia Cases

    3,710

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,626

  • Syphilis Cases

    34

#10

Fayetteville, NC

Fayetteville, NC
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,255

  • Metro Population

    332,330

  • HIV Cases

    1,368

  • Chlamydia Cases

    4,337

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,741

  • Syphilis Cases

    49

#11

New Orleans, LA

New Orleans, LA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,213

  • Metro Population

    825,057

  • HIV Cases

    6,911

  • Chlamydia Cases

    8,190

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    3,004

  • Syphilis Cases

    153

#12

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,045

  • Metro Population

    1,117,765

  • HIV Cases

    6,601

  • Chlamydia Cases

    11,407

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    4,620

  • Syphilis Cases

    226

#13

Milwaukee, WI

Milwaukee, WI
  • STD Cases / 100K

    2,007

  • Metro Population

    948,201

  • HIV Cases

    2,144

  • Chlamydia Cases

    11,703

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    5,083

  • Syphilis Cases

    101

#14

Tallahassee, FL

Tallahassee, FL
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,990

  • Metro Population

    292,502

  • HIV Cases

    1,257

  • Chlamydia Cases

    3,379

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,083

  • Syphilis Cases

    101

#15

Indianapolis, IN

Indianapolis, IN
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,905

  • Metro Population

    1,021,669

  • HIV Cases

    4,736

  • Chlamydia Cases

    10,503

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    4,073

  • Syphilis Cases

    154

#16

Baton Rouge, LA

Baton Rouge, LA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,893

  • Metro Population

    565,628

  • HIV Cases

    4,173

  • Chlamydia Cases

    4,781

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,635

  • Syphilis Cases

    118

#17

Fort Lauderdale, FL

Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,871

  • Metro Population

    1,951,260

  • HIV Cases

    19,483

  • Chlamydia Cases

    12,167

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    4,436

  • Syphilis Cases

    426

#18

Columbia, SC

Columbia, SC
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,817

  • Metro Population

    709,608

  • HIV Cases

    3,879

  • Chlamydia Cases

    6,405

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    2,505

  • Syphilis Cases

    105

#19

Little Rock, AR

Little Rock, AR
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,791

  • Metro Population

    392,680

  • HIV Cases

    1,940

  • Chlamydia Cases

    3,419

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,513

  • Syphilis Cases

    160

#20

Savannah, GA

Savannah, GA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,783

  • Metro Population

    289,195

  • HIV Cases

    1,696

  • Chlamydia Cases

    2,633

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    765

  • Syphilis Cases

    62

#21

Shreveport, LA

Shreveport, LA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,758

  • Metro Population

    370,107

  • HIV Cases

    1,437

  • Chlamydia Cases

    3,543

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    1,447

  • Syphilis Cases

    78

#22

Atlanta, GA

Atlanta, GA
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,714

  • Metro Population

    3,780,933

  • HIV Cases

    31,833

  • Chlamydia Cases

    23,724

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    8,136

  • Syphilis Cases

    1,100

#23

Jacksonville, FL

Jacksonville, FL
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,694

  • Metro Population

    1,166,253

  • HIV Cases

    6,450

  • Chlamydia Cases

    8,810

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    4,259

  • Syphilis Cases

    239

#24

Miami, FL

Miami, FL
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,686

  • Metro Population

    2,761,581

  • HIV Cases

    26,316

  • Chlamydia Cases

    14,680

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    4,971

  • Syphilis Cases

    581

#25

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland, OH
  • STD Cases / 100K

    1,681

  • Metro Population

    1,243,857

  • HIV Cases

    4,617

  • Chlamydia Cases

    11,051

  • Gonorrhea Cases

    5,146

  • Syphilis Cases

    92

Rounding out the Top 100

Last year, many cities outside of the Top 100 asked us for their ranking. So this year, we decided to expand our report to include the next 50 cities with the highest STD rates by rank.

Rank Metro Area STD Cases / 100K Metro Population HIV Cases Chlamydia Cases Gonorrhea Cases Syphilis Cases
26 Charlotte, NC 1,680 1,316,747 6,544 11,377 3,943 261
27 Gainesville, FL 1,672 269,956 1,009 2,672 779 55
28 Greensboro, NC 1,667 1,079,205 4,392 9,354 4,101 145
29 Norfolk, VA 1,666 1,031,531 4,115 9,672 3,276 125
30 Cincinatti, OH 1,584 816,684 2,943 7,126 2,762 108
31 Peoria, IL 1,565 180,621 355 1,578 880 13
32 Denver, CO 1,565 1,879,575 8,226 15,153 5,741 292
33 Columbus, OH 1,550 1,310,300 4,833 10,302 4,957 213
34 Biloxi, MS 1,543 206,650 652 1,626 864 46
35 Birmingham, AL 1,532 932,847 4,007 6,751 3,390 142
36 Chicago, IL 1,520 6,407,019 26,131 50,825 19,400 1,060
37 Los Angeles, CA 1,464 10,105,518 49,449 69,712 26,195 2,550
38 Pensacola, FL 1,460 315,534 1,280 2,355 949 23
39 Louisville, KY 1,455 770,517 2,983 5,608 2,442 181
40 Toledo, OH 1,446 429,899 939 3,445 1,800 34
41 Rochester, NY 1,426 742,474 2,290 5,787 2,302 207
42 Anchorage, AK 1,426 291,538 0 2,771 1,282 103
43 Kalamazoo, MI 1,423 264,870 365 2,304 1,079 20
44 Richmond, VA 1,411 906,600 2,495 7,339 2,818 143
45 Huntsville, AL 1,409 366,519 800 2,845 1,472 47
46 Newark, NJ 1,389 1,852,062 12,421 10,356 2,776 170
47 Jersey City, NJ 1,375 676,061 4,884 3,409 922 79
48 Albuquerque, NM 1,361 678,701 1,495 5,372 2,101 267
49 Lexington, KY 1,350 323,780 919 2,574 809 69
50 Orlando, FL 1,321 2,204,972 10,882 13,618 4,250 380
51 Sacramento, CA 1,302 1,540,975 4,285 11,076 4,270 433
52 Dayton, OH 1,294 532,331 1,412 3,398 2,007 70
53 Albany, NY 1,292 307,117 1,146 2,015 742 66
54 Las Vegas, NV 1,287 2,231,647 8,600 14,044 5,448 628
55 San Diego, CA 1,285 3,343,364 13,131 22,920 6,366 547
56 Mobile, AL 1,280 631,779 2,160 4,101 1,734 94
57 Tuscaloosa, AL 1,276 208,911 494 1,537 575 59
58 Raleigh, NC 1,264 1,409,044 4,972 9,288 3,294 252
59 Chattanooga, TN 1,264 364,286 991 2,486 1,098 28
60 Lubbock, TX 1,257 307,412 510 2,237 1,079 37
61 Dallas, TX 1,249 4,501,982 21,409 24,647 9,795 360
62 Austin, TX 1,247 1,248,743 4,931 7,681 2,739 217
63 Beaumont, TX 1,240 255,001 1,235 1,324 564 39
64 Corpus Christi, TX 1,239 362,265 633 2,883 838 134
65 Oklahoma City, OK 1,239 1,218,698 2,689 8,287 3,811 311
66 Kileen, TX 1,233 430,450 1,018 3,097 1,136 56
67 St. Louis, MO 1,224 996,945 2,467 6,599 2,997 136
68 Bakersfield, CA 1,220 896,764 1,697 6,876 2,102 264
69 Decatur, AL 1,194 223,801 293 1,435 931 13
70 Kansas City, MO 1,192 1,544,227 3,980 9,766 4,314 344
71 Fresno, CA 1,186 994,400 1,981 7,225 2,397 188
72 Oakland, CA 1,179 1,666,753 6,055 9,645 3,669 290
73 Wichita, KS 1,176 513,607 837 3,577 1,566 58
74 Des Moines, IA 1,170 487,204 791 3,468 1,392 49
75 Fort Wayne, IN 1,165 375,351 539 2,781 1,044 9
76 Harrisburg, PA 1,148 277,097 597 1,875 670 38
77 Greenville, SC 1,147 514,213 1,416 3,138 1,276 70
78 Wilmington, DE 1,132 559,335 2,064 3,400 818 52
79 Phoenix, AZ 1,132 4,857,962 12,291 30,413 11,317 979
80 Atlantic City, NJ 1,129 265,429 1,213 1,338 431 16
81 Syracuse, NY 1,129 461,809 1,174 2,984 1,039 19
82 Lafayette, LA 1,129 304,972 943 1,874 603 24
83 Tacoma, WA 1,129 891,299 1,493 6,344 2,135 91
84 Flint, MI 1,128 406,892 561 2,916 1,089 23
85 Tampa, FL 1,124 2,951,798 12,445 15,370 4,838 520
86 Tucson, AZ 1,121 1,039,073 2,579 6,677 2,211 176
87 Detroit, MI 1,117 3,887,853 9,986 23,353 9,607 477
88 Portland, OR 1,116 1,409,575 4,051 8,153 3,265 267
89 South Bend, IN 1,104 270,771 540 1,792 650 8
90 Myrtle Beach, SC 1,084 344,147 982 2,019 708 22
91 Sioux Falls, SD 1,084 192,876 266 1,127 681 16
92 Omaha, NE 1,074 566,880 232 4,137 1,662 59
93 Houston, TX 1,073 6,077,402 28,145 27,188 9,287 594
94 Buffalo, NY 1,066 919,719 2,293 5,496 1,950 67
95 Palm Beach, FL 1,065 1,485,941 7,917 6,304 1,484 121
96 Stockton, CA 1,061 752,660 1,316 4,762 1,698 209
97 New Haven, CT 1,060 857,620 3,231 4,337 1,467 60
98 Providence, RI 1,057 636,084 980 4,392 1,270 82
99 Akron, OH 1,055 541,918 930 3,462 1,298 28
100 Minneapolis, MN 1,055 2,588,874 6,664 14,696 5,694 250
101 Seattle, WA 1,053 2,233,163 6,899 11,639 4,640 338
102 Trenton, NJ 1,052 369,811 1,371 1,952 530 39
103 Riverside, CA 1,046 4,622,361 13,483 26,034 7,958 883
104 Nashville, TN 1,023 324,890 562 2,087 645 31
105 Merced, CA 985 274,765 295 1,653 690 68
106 Waco, TX 983 254,607 466 1,490 522 25
107 Evansville, IN 977 200,124 289 1,113 533 21
108 Fayetteville, AR 971 236,961 332 1,549 401 18
109 Ocala, FL 961 359,977 1,060 1,761 615 24
110 Lansing, MI 955 292,735 439 1,799 532 26
111 Honolulu, HI 943 980,080 1,530 6,399 1,208 101
112 Hartford, CT 941 1,159,481 3,721 5,451 1,681 63
113 Modesto, CA 937 549,815 795 3,228 980 149
114 Youngstown, OH 932 229,642 503 1,177 449 12
115 Boston, MA 927 4,561,575 14,560 22,030 5,235 452
116 Galveston, TX 921 337,890 1,179 1,438 480 14
117 San Antonio, TX 912 1,986,049 6,308 8,531 3,035 244
118 Colorado Springs, CO 890 713,856 915 4,130 1,267 41
119 Gary, IN 882 484,411 1,028 2,408 799 36
120 Pittsburgh, PA 882 1,218,452 2,456 6,301 1,914 71
121 Sarasota, FL 879 394,855 1,061 1,722 614 72
122 Spokane, WA 872 514,631 640 2,670 1,053 125
123 Cedar Rapids, IA 869 225,909 290 1,249 417 8
124 Fort Worth, TX 868 2,084,931 5,727 8,885 3,271 210
125 Salinas, CA 840 435,594 729 2,425 471 33
126 Daytona Beach, FL 836 547,538 1,745 2,046 715 69
127 Salem, OR 834 346,868 435 1,886 547 24
128 Madison, WI 832 542,364 551 2,990 960 11
129 Santa Barbara, CA 823 446,527 538 2,624 457 55
130 Grand Rapids, MI 810 1,117,868 1,296 5,716 2,011 29
131 Eugene, OR 789 379,611 418 1,931 592 54
132 Brownsville, TX 784 423,908 934 2,077 313 1
133 El Paso, TX 776 840,758 2,230 3,509 702 87
134 Lincoln, NE 771 317,272 78 1,802 543 24
135 Canton, OH 759 371,574 480 1,784 538 20
136 Fairfield, CT 743 943,823 2,657 3,507 795 56
137 San Jose, CA 738 1,937,570 3,269 8,143 2,504 392
138 Utica, NY 699 229,577 578 851 162 13
139 Salt Lake City, UT 696 1,504,346 2,153 6,297 1,923 98
140 Erie, PA 653 272,061 182 1,259 331 5
141 Nassau, NY 648 1,358,343 2,951 4,960 818 72
142 Boulder, CO 637 326,078 468 1,359 236 14
143 Boise, ID 630 469,966 162 2,203 580 14
144 Green Bay, WI 612 263,378 169 1,192 248 3
145 Naples, FL 606 378,488 960 1,124 181 28
146 Scranton, PA 601 317,646 275 1,391 222 21
147 McAllen, TX 593 865,939 1,464 3,140 520 12
148 Fort Collins, CO 548 350,518 285 1,362 263 11
149 Manchester, NH 304 460,308 313 980 91 17
150 Provo, UT 273 622,213 214 1,255 224 5

Covid-19 and underreporting STD rates

One urgent question is unique to our current moment: do the CDC’s numbers paint an accurate picture of the extent of our problems today or are STD infections now underreported due to insufficient pandemic-era testing?

During the pandemic, many testing labs lacked sufficient personnel or had to shift focus entirely to Covid-19 in an attempt to keep up during the deadly surges. This led to serious under-testing at what amounted to a high-water mark in STD infections nationwide.

Understanding that people did not stop having sex during the past year, experts fear that the lack of normal access to STD testing and treatment likely means our infection rates are, if anything, higher than they appear in this latest report. As recently as January 2021, a survey revealed that over a third of staff in STD testing programs at the state and local levels have needed to remain focused on Covid-19.

Proposed actions to improve the national outlook

We’re often asked how metropolitan areas can take actions to improve STD rates. For this, we’re inclined to turn to the STI National Strategic Plan released by the HHS. It provides recommended approaches and enhancements aimed at turning our trends in a positive direction. Among its proposals are:

  • Partnering with pharmacies and clinics to increase easy local access to STD testing and treatment.
  • Establishing express clinics, where people could access walk-in testing and treatment without full exams.
  • Harnessing the potential of telehealth/telemedicine as a convenient method of testing and consultation for people across the country, including in rural areas. (If you live in such an area, are uncomfortable talking with your doctor, or just can’t find the time to go get tested, an increasingly popular option is to take an at-home STD test.)

The CDC stresses, “If you are sexually active, getting tested for STDs is one of the most important things you can do to protect your health. Make sure you have an open and honest conversation about your sexual history and STD testing with your doctor…”

Our STD testing and treatment infrastructure had been strained prior to the pandemic, contributing to increased STD rates each year. It’s up to all of us to decide whether reports next year and the year after reveal the 7th and 8th consecutive years of record-high infections or we instead make this tide turn, addressing budget shortfalls and improving public education and access to testing and treatment in our communities.

How we collected data for this report

All of the STD data found in our report – including case statistics for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia – are from the CDC’s latest data release from April 2021. Syphilis data includes only primary and secondary syphilis cases and does not include congenital and early latent syphilis cases. HIV cases are not reported for some cities. Statistics for other relatively common STDs, such as herpes, are not collected by the CDC at this time and hence are left out of our analysis. For more information about which statistics the CDC does and does not track, see its STD Data & Statistics page.

All estimated metro area and state population data is from the CDC and the US Census Bureau. For our interactive map, our research team decided to use counties as visual proxies for most metro areas. The CDC does not have STD data for all US counties.

For our rankings, we chose to include only city metro areas with an estimated population of 200,000 or more. Though Washington, DC is technically a district, we chose to include it as a city. No statistical testing was used during the production of this research.

Sources

https://www.cdc.gov/std/statistics/2019/default.htm
https://www.ncsddc.org/resource/covid-19-and-the-state-of-the-std-field-phase-iii
https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/default.htm
https://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/default.htm
https://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/default.htm
https://www.cdc.gov/std/hiv/default.htm
https://www.countyhealthrankings.org/explore-health-rankings
https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/surveillance-data-tables/vol-1-no-3/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats18/default.htm
https://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/nchhstpatlas/tables.html
https://www.census.gov/data/datasets/time-series/demo/popest/2010s-counties-total.html

Additional STD Resources

STD Information:
STD Symptoms & Causes from the Mayo Clinic
STD Guide from Planned Parenthood
STD Awareness for Teens from KidsHealth
STD Testing Resources:
Mayo Clinic: STD Testing Guide
Planned Parenthood: STD Testing
Innerbody: STD Testing At-Home Guide
STD Testing Companies:
LetsGetChecked Review | MyLAB Box Review
STDcheck Review | Everlywell Review
BlueChew Review | BlueChew Free Trial Support Resources:
BetterHelp | Talkspace

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